The ADDIE Design-Process

The ADDIE model was developed in 1975 at Florida State University and still serves as an easy, approachable model to develop learning content and learning experiences. It’s a perfect base to start your work with Bitmark and Get More Brain!
The image shows the ADDIE Design-Model: Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, Evaluate
Roman Schurter
Roman Schurter
+20 years educational content creation, Community Manager and Learning Designer at Get More Brain.

The ADDIE model was developed in 1975 at Florida State University and still serves as an easy, approachable model to develop learning content and learning experiences.

The image shows the ADDIE Design-Model: Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, Evaluate
The ADDIE Design-Model

ADDIE: Analyze

In the analysis phase, you will identify and analyze the needs of all stakeholders: learners, coaches, organization. This stage clarifies the instructional problems and the given learning environment.

Your tasks as a content creator and instructional designer:

  • Who is the audience and their characteristics?
  • Identify the new behavioral outcome?
  • What types of learning constraints exist?
  • What are the delivery options?
  • What are the online pedagogical considerations?
  • What is the timeline for project completion?
  • What is the knowledge level and what knowledge gap will the course fill in?
  • What tasks are the learners already doing, and what would the learners have to do to bridge the knowledge gap?
  • What is the learning environment like, and what are the constraints in this environment?
  • What is the scope, timeline and cost of the project?

ADDIE: Design

The design phase should include ideas for all aspects of your learning experience: scenarios, dialogues, buttons, photos, color palettes, characters and more. E-learning designers should also give some time to contemplate what the course evaluation will look like.

Your tasks as an instructional designer:

  • Documentation of the project’s instructional, visual and technical design strategy
  • Apply instructional strategies according to the intended behavioral outcomes by domain (cognitive, affective, psychomotor).
  • Create storyboards
  • Design the user interface and user experience
  • Prototype creation
  • Apply visual design (graphic design)
  • The minimum threshold for the learner to be a part of the training course.
  • Learning objectives for each task to be covered in the course.
  • Determine the flow and structure of the learning modules.
  • Design an evaluation system to assess impact and commitment.
  • Map each phase of the learning module to the timeline decided.

ADDIE: Develop

The development phase is where the developers create and assemble the content assets that were created in the design phase. Programmers and content creators work to develop and/or integrate all aspects of the learning experience. Testers perform debugging procedures.

Your tasks as an instructional designer:

  • Select a delivery method for the learning modules.
  • Translate designs into actual learning materials.
  • Make sure that the learning material covers all goals and objectives of the training design process.
  • Create documentation guides for trainers, a list of auxiliary resources needed for learners, etc.

ADDIE: Implement

The implementation phase determines how, when, and to whom your course will be distributed. As an Instructional designer, your job is to make sure that all the components of your e-learning course are ready to go when you are called upon.

  • Distribute the learning modules to the learners

ADDIE: Evaluate

In the first versions of the ADDIE model, evaluation was the very last step. Newer iterations suggest that evaluation is an ongoing process, and it certainly should not be started at the end of the course development process. The goal here is to have some quantifiable data that demonstrates the success of your course and whether it is meeting the learning objectives.

Your tasks as an instructional designer:

  • Was the instruction clear to the learners?
  • Did it motivate the learners?
  • How did it impact the learner and did it bridge the intended knowledge gap?
  • What did not work in the course?
  • What can be improved?
  • How can it be done?

This post appeared first on our Medium-Channel.

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